Who has a phobia?

So very many of us would say ‘I have’ when asked that question. . A phobia of spiders… A phobia of heights… A phobia of vomit… A phobia of buttons… or clowns… or being in a car… or clouds… or anything at all.

The complex thing about a phobia is that it could be anything in the world and it is essentially an irrational and overwhelming reaction to something. It’s also important to note that there is a difference between a phobia and extreme anxiety about something, as these are not the same.

Ask yourself this?

Can you be in the presence of something you are phobic of? What would you experience? If not, what would need to happen so you could do this?

Can you see a video of what you are phobia of? What would you experience? If not, what would need to happen so you could do this?

Can you look at a photo of what you are phobic of? What would you experience? If not, what would need to happen so you could do this?

Can you listen to someone talk about what you are phobic of? What would you experience? If not, what would need to happen so you could do this?

What about if someone gave you £1million to face your phobia? Could you? Would you?

What about if you had to face your phobia to save a loved one? Could you? Would you?

Everyone reading this will have reached different points with that, as to what felt manageable, and what you could and couldn’t do. How intense does your phobia feel when thinking of all those questions.

Having a phobia can completely take over your life. You can find yourself on alert for it, becoming anxious you might have to deal with it, you can find yourself avoiding situations, places or people to avoid having to risk being confronted with your phobia. It can be all consuming at times… and at other times, or for other people, it can be manageable until in that specific situation. For example if you are phobic of travelling on aeroplanes, this would only bother you if you were faced on a situation where that may be something you have to do (such as fly abroad). Equally, if someone was phobic about aeroplanes in general, then this may be all consuming as they might see them in the sky, or on tv, or hear them, or see photos of them and constantly be alert for them.

I have worked with people who have lots of types of phobias whilst I’ve been working as a therapist and, particularly when using BWRT®, have seen people experience some amazing, quick and effective changes to their phobia. There is a particular kind of look of wonder when someone realises that something they have been phobic of for so long, has eased… or, in some cases, completely gone.

I would always advocate BWRT® for phobias, as I have seen the difference it can make to people and the way they live their life.

Are you ready to lose your phobia?

Maybe now is the time. Check out BWRT® for Change.